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   TracyT

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(0)

4. Changing Partners

, 29 2012 . 03:24 +








(0)

. .

, 17 2012 . 22:22 +



(0)

, 25 2012 . 05:54 +




,

(0)

Elvis Presley - No more.

, 30 2012 . 19:13 +












Pronunciation of T
Part 1. The true T and the flap T

From the beginning, its been a very bitter winter. Back in December we had a terrible ice storm and many families, mine included, lost electricity. Today is a little warmer than usual. But I know colder temperatures will return. Ill try to stay warm. You do the same.

If you listened closely to my opening talk, I used a lot of words with the T sound. I did that to help you understand that there are different ways we pronounce T in American English. Now in a previous lesson I explained the omission of T. That is when words are written with the letter T, but the T sound is not said.

In this lesson Id like to talk about two different pronunciations of T:
(1) What I call the true T sound as in talk, to, terrible.
(2) And what is called a flap T or a tap

In my opening talk you heard me said these words:
- bitter- winter terrible storm today little temperatures return try.
and this phrase:
- a lot of families lost electricity.
The Ts in blue are a flap T, the underlined Ts are a true T. By the end of this lesson you should not only be able to hear the two different pronunciations of T, you should also have more confidence knowing when we use these two different sounds and how to make them yourself.

Lets first talk about a true T sound. A true T sounds like this /T/. You hear this sound in words like:
- talk true stop return.
So the true T occurs:
(1) at the beginning of words (either alone, or with other consonants st, tr, str)
(2) at the beginning of a stressed syllable.
Return has two syllables. But its the second syllable that is stressed. T is at the start of that syllable. So, we say return. Again, the true T is in all four words: talk, true, stop, return.
Now, how am I making this sound? The T sound is what is known in English pronunciation as a stop. A stop (also called plosive) is a consonant sound that is made by stopping the airflow. In the case of T, the airflow is stopped by the tip of our tongue and that hard bump behind you upper front teeth. The tip of your tongue touches that hard bump and stops the airflow and then releases it.
Picture this:
These are your teeth. And this is the roof of your mouth. If it helps, Ill try to draw the face, picturing a nose. Okay. Heres the eyes. Okay. Thats you, your nose, your lips, your teeth, and there is that hard bump behind your upper front teeth. Now your tongue looks something like this, OK. So, the tip of your tongue touches the hard bump. The airflow is stopped. It cannot come out until the tip drops down and releases that air. Thats why we call the true T a stop.

So I want you to know three things when you make the T sound.

First, you need to stop the airflow. You stop it with the tip of your tongue and that hard bump behind your upper front teeth.

Second, when you release the air there should be a puff of air. Are you making the sound correctly?
If you want to check if you are doing this correctly, take a piece of paper. As you say the T sound, the puff of air should be strong enough to move the paper in front of your lips. Watch. See?

Now let me note one very important point.
The true T makes a puff of air but only when T or TR start a word or a stressed syllable. With ST or STR the true T loses that strong puff of air. So, in the words TWO and TRUE we have the puff of air.
But in STEW and STREW that strong puff of air is absent. Take your hand and place it in front of your lips, say these four words, and youll feel the difference.

All right. The third thing Id like you to remember is that the T sound is a quiet sound = unvoiced. Its whats known as unvoiced consonant. Meaning there is no voice, youll fell no vibration when you make the T sound. You know, youre doing it correctly, if you can feel the difference between this /t/ and its voiced partner /d/.
/t/ unvoiced stop
/d/ voiced stop
These two consonant sounds are made basically the same way, but /t/ is quiet, its unvoiced; and /d/ is voiced. So youll feel no vibrations when you make the true T sound. And you will feel vibration when you make the /d/ sound. Also, take that piece of paper again and watch the difference. Now, here is the /t/ Here is the /d/. There is more air released. There is a puff, a strong puff with the /t/. That strong puff is not present with the /d/.

Exercise I.
Listen and repeat.

Group I.
All these words begin with the true T sound:
- table, talk, tap, teach, time, touch, toy, turn, two.

Group II.
All these words begin with true T followed by an R:
- traffic, train, tree, trend, triangle, trip, trouble, true, try.

Group III.
All these words begin with ST or STR. So, be careful not to release so strong puff of air:
- stamp, stem, stick, stop, strain, stream, strong, strum.

And Group IV.
We have a true T in the middle of a word at the beginning of a stressed syllable:
attack, between, eternal, Italian, mistake (note: with ST we dont have a strong puff of air; again mistake), particular, retire, return.

Please note, a true T is used in both primary and secondary stressed syllables. Let me help you understand through these three examples.
Attack is a word with two syllables. Stress is on the second: Attack. So /t/, although in the middle of a word, is at the beginning of a stressed syllable. So, we have a true T: attack.
Appetizer and Secretary are longer words. They have both primary and secondary stress. Primary stress is at the beginning of these words but the T still falls on a stress syllable. Its a secondary stress. A little weaker but still stressed. Thats why its still a true T. And we say : appetizer, secretary .
End of Part I. Please go on to the next part of this lesson.



(0)

11_Elvis Presley - He Knows Just What I Need with lyrics

, 30 2012 . 19:34 +










I. Please, transcribe the video, save it onto your computer and check it against the master below.

II. Practice out loud with Jennifer, while following the transcript:
1. Start by repeating after Jennifer. Pause the video after each sentence and repeat it right away.
2. After you get quite comfortable repeating sentences in the pauses, for added challenge
a). practice saying the text along with Jeniffer, lagging behind by 2-3 words, and
b). then simultaneously with her.

I. , , , .

II. , :
1. . .
2. , :
). , 2-3 ,
). .
Collapse ⇑ TRANSCRIPT


Pronunciation of T
Part 2. Omission of the consonant sound /T/

Well, as you can see weve had a very big snowfall here in New England. But thats fine by me because I really enjoy a white Christmas. And Christmas is only two days away.

You know, Christmas is one of those words in English that is written with the t but we dont pronounce it. Now many viewers have asked me about the pronunciation of /t/ in American English. And I hope to make that lesson in the future. But for now, what Id like to do is explain when the /t/ is NOT pronounced. Im going to explain four cases in which we dont say the /t/ usually. And hopefully, this will help you better understand American English when its spoken.

Group One. In some words, we always omit, or leave out the /t/.
For example: Christmas ['krɪsməs] . Never say chris-t-mas only chris-mas.
Now here is a list of words in which /t/ sound is left out. Note that this list is not complete. Listen as I say the words: Bustle ['bʌsəl], Christmas ['krɪsməs] , hustle ['hʌsəl], mistletoe ['mɪsəltou], whistle ['wɪsəl], wrestle ['wrɜsəl]. Now, bustle and hustle are similar words and they refer to busy, noisy activity, kind of like a holiday shopping you see in stores. Mistletoe is a kind of plant with a white berry; and there is a Christmas tradition that if two people are caught under the mistletoe they have to kiss. Whistle as you know is a sound. Thats me whistling. And wrestle means to struggle or fight with.
Let me say the words again and you repeat after me: Bustle, Christmas, hustle, mistletoe, whistle, wrestle.

Text One. Listen as I read the text.
I love the hustle and bustle of Christmas. Even while I wrestle with shopping bags, I want to whistle a merry holiday tune. And Im never too busy to share a sweet kiss under the mistletoe.
Now read the text again. Ill pause after each sentence and I want you to repeat after me.

Group Two. In fast informal speech we sometimes omit the / t/ in the prefix inter- as in international. So, in a careful speech we say international [ˌɪntə'næʃənəl], but in fast informal speech you may hear in-ernational [ˌɪnə' _ næʃənəl].
Here is a list of words that all share the same prefix inter-. Ill first read the word with careful pronunciation. You will hear the pronunciation of /t/. Then Ill repeat the word with fast informal pronunciation. You will not hear the /t/.
Listen carefully and try to repeat: Interactive, intermediate, international, internet.

Text Two. Listen as I read the text. I will not read slowly and carefully. I will be reading fast. So that youll hear the omission of the consonant sound /t/. The Ts that are underlined are the Ts that are omitted.
English is truly an international language. Its easier now than ever to learn English, whether youre a beginner, intermediate, or advanced student. The internet offers language videos and lots of interactive exercises.
If youd like to go back, you may use your pause key to pause and repeat after me. But this is a mainly an exercise in listening. Id like you to understand the spoken English.

Group Three. In fast informal speech we sometimes omit the /t/ in a consonant group at the end of a word. Now, by consonant group I mean three consonant sounds or more. For example, the word acts. We have three consonant sounds c-t-s. These are voiceless sounds and we dropped the middle one which happens to be a /t/. Instead of [əkts] we say [ək_s].
Here is a group of five common words in English. They all end with a consonant group that even for a native speakers is difficult to pronounce. Thats why in fast speech we leave out the /t/ sound. Listen closely and try to repeat after me: accepts, acts, lifts, rests, tests. In the final two words you need to lengthen the /s/ sound, make it long, so that people could understand the word youre saying: res-s, tes-s.

Text Three. Listen as I read the text. Ill not be reading at a slow rate. Ill read fast, so that the omission of the Ts sound natural.
Grandpa accepts help from no one. Its sad. He lifts heavy things and acts like its easy, but the weight tests his strength. He rests when he thinks no one is looking. I keep telling him to let me help. One day maybe hell listen.
Note that listen is one of those words in which we always omit the /t/ sound. Now if youd like to go back, you can use your pause button to repeat after me. But again, this is another text in which I feel its more important to understand rather than repeat.

Group Four. In fast informal speech we sometimes omit the /t/ when the ending of one word and the beginning of another form a consonant group. For example, She kept shopping. Now in careful speech you would hear the /t/: She kept_t_ shopping. But in fast informal speech we dropped the /t/ in that consonant group. The consonant group is p-t-sh She kep_shopping.
Read and then answer the questions. First, Ill state the question. You can repeat after me and then you can state your answer.
Number One. Lets drop the /t/ in the consonant group s-t-j:
Whats the worst joke youve heard?

Number Two. Were going to drop the /t/ sound in the consonant group s-t-p:
Which animals make the best pets?

Three. Were going to drop the /t/ sound in the consonant group s-t-j:
Whats the worst job in the world?

End of lesson.

Happy Holidays, everyone!

***********************
***********************





Pronunciation of T
Part 1. The true T and the flap T

From the beginning, its been a very bitter winter. Back in December we had a terrible ice storm and many families, mine included, lost electricity. Today is a little warmer than usual. But I know colder temperatures will return. Ill try to stay warm. You do the same.

If you listened closely to my opening talk, I used a lot of words with the T sound. I did that to help you understand that there are different ways we pronounce T in American English. Now in a previous lesson I explained the omission of T. That is when words are written with the letter T, but the T sound is not said.

In this lesson Id like to talk about two different pronunciations of T:
(1) What I call the true T sound as in talk, to, terrible.
(2) And what is called a flap T or a tap

In my opening talk you heard me said these words:
- bitter- winter terrible storm today little temperatures return try.
and this phrase:
- a lot of families lost electricity.
The Ts in blue are a flap T, the underlined Ts are a true T. By the end of this lesson you should not only be able to hear the two different pronunciations of T, you should also have more confidence knowing when we use these two different sounds and how to make them yourself.

Lets first talk about a true T sound. A true T sounds like this /T/. You hear this sound in words like:
- talk true stop return.
So the true T occurs:
(1) at the beginning of words (either alone, or with other consonants st, tr, str)
(2) at the beginning of a stressed syllable.
Return has two syllables. But its the second syllable that is stressed. T is at the start of that syllable. So, we say return. Again, the true T is in all four words: talk, true, stop, return.
Now, how am I making this sound? The T sound is what is known in English pronunciation as a stop. A stop (also called plosive) is a consonant sound that is made by stopping the airflow. In the case of T, the airflow is stopped by the tip of our tongue and that hard bump behind you upper front teeth. The tip of your tongue touches that hard bump and stops the airflow and then releases it.
Picture this:
These are your teeth. And this is the roof of your mouth. If it helps, Ill try to draw the face, picturing a nose. Okay. Heres the eyes. Okay. Thats you, your nose, your lips, your teeth, and there is that hard bump behind your upper front teeth. Now your tongue looks something like this, OK. So, the tip of your tongue touches the hard bump. The airflow is stopped. It cannot come out until the tip drops down and releases that air. Thats why we call the true T a stop.

So I want you to know three things when you make the T sound.

First, you need to stop the airflow. You stop it with the tip of your tongue and that hard bump behind your upper front teeth.

Second, when you release the air there should be a puff of air. Are you making the sound correctly?
If you want to check if you are doing this correctly, take a piece of paper. As you say the T sound, the puff of air should be strong enough to move the paper in front of your lips. Watch. See?

Now let me note one very important point.
The true T makes a puff of air but only when T or TR start a word or a stressed syllable. With ST or STR the true T loses that strong puff of air. So, in the words TWO and TRUE we have the puff of air.
But in STEW and STREW that strong puff of air is absent. Take your hand and place it in front of your lips, say these four words, and youll feel the difference.

All right. The third thing Id like you to remember is that the T sound is a quiet sound = unvoiced. Its whats known as unvoiced consonant. Meaning there is no voice, youll fell no vibration when you make the T sound. You know, youre doing it correctly, if you can feel the difference between this /t/ and its voiced partner /d/.
/t/ unvoiced stop
/d/ voiced stop
These two consonant sounds are made basically the same way, but /t/ is quiet, its unvoiced; and /d/ is voiced. So youll feel no vibrations when you make the true T sound. And you will feel vibration when you make the /d/ sound. Also, take that piece of paper again and watch the difference. Now, here is the /t/ Here is the /d/. There is more air released. There is a puff, a strong puff with the /t/. That strong puff is not present with the /d/.

Exercise I.
Listen and repeat.

Group I.
All these words begin with the true T sound:
- table, talk, tap, teach, time, touch, toy, turn, two.

Group II.
All these words begin with true T followed by an R:
- traffic, train, tree, trend, triangle, trip, trouble, true, try.

Group III.
All these words begin with ST or STR. So, be careful not to release so strong puff of air:
- stamp, stem, stick, stop, strain, stream, strong, strum.

And Group IV.
We have a true T in the middle of a word at the beginning of a stressed syllable:
attack, between, eternal, Italian, mistake (note: with ST we dont have a strong puff of air; again mistake), particular, retire, return.

Please note, a true T is used in both primary and secondary stressed syllables. Let me help you understand through these three examples.
Attack is a word with two syllables. Stress is on the second: Attack. So /t/, although in the middle of a word, is at the beginning of a stressed syllable. So, we have a true T: attack.
Appetizer and Secretary are longer words. They have both primary and secondary stress. Primary stress is at the beginning of these words but the T still falls on a stress syllable. Its a secondary stress. A little weaker but still stressed. Thats why its still a true T. And we say : appetizer, secretary .
End of Part I. Please go on to the next part of this lesson.

(0)

12_Louis Armstrong-Go Down Moses

, 30 2012 . 19:44 +


















I. Please, transcribe the video, save it onto your computer and check it against the master below.

II. Practice out loud with Jennifer, while following the transcript:
1. Start by repeating after Jennifer. Pause the video after each sentence and repeat it right away.
2. After you get quite comfortable repeating sentences in the pauses, for added challenge
a). practice saying the text along with Jeniffer, lagging behind by 2-3 words, and
b). then simultaneously with her.

I. , , , .

II. , :
1. . .
2. , :
). , 2-3 ,
). .
Collapse ⇑ TRANSCRIPT


Pronunciation of R.

Are you an early bird or a night owl? An early bird is someone who gets up very early in the morning. A night owl is someone who enjoys going to bed very late. By nature Im a night owl, but ever since I became a mother Ive had to be an early bird.
There is a proverb in English: The early bird catches the worm. It means success comes to people who start early and prepare well. Try saying that proverb with me. The early bird catches the worm. Do you find it a little difficult to say words like early, bird, worm? If so, then this is a lesson for you. And in the next few lessons were going to talk about the R sound. Were going to have three main parts in this lesson.

First, were going to talk about R when it behaves like a vowel sound. Then well talk about R when it behaves like a consonant sound. And finally were going to look at the challenging combination when R and L are together in the same word. So, lets begin.

So lets talk about R when it behaves like a vowel sound. Well start with the basic sound /ɜː/. If you know phonetic transcription, it looks like that /ɜː/ . This is the sound that you hear in a word like sir or in my name Jennifer.
So, the /ɜː/ sound can be stressed or unstressed. Its stressed in sir, but its unstressed in my name Jennifer. Either way it behaves like a vowel and that means that its a voiced sound. So, if you take your hand and place it on your throat and say /ɜː/ you should feel vibration. Its a voiced sound from beginning to end. The second thing you need to do is round your lips, not a lot, but a little.

Now lets talk about your tongue.
You get to see my great artistic skills. Those are your teeth, your upper and lower teeth. Behind your upper teeth there is a hard bump, right there. This is the roof of your mouth. What you need to do first is gently raise the front part of your tongue, the tip, towards that hard bump. So, thats the front part of your tongue. Raise it a little toward the hard bump but do not touch it. Its very important to know that when you make the /ɜː/ sound the tip of your tongue does not touch the bump or any part of the roof of your mouth. Okay? Now, because the front part of your tongue is raised its going to feel like the center of your tongue is going down. Okay? But the back part of your tongue is raised again. Its pulled into a tight ball. And that tight ball is raised toward the back part of the roof of your mouth. Got it? Something like that.

Now, another important thing to know is that even though the center feels as if its going down, the sides of your tongue must be up enough to touch your upper teeth on the sides, here and here. So, let me summarize that again. With your tongue the front part is raised towards the bump but it doesnt touch. The center feels like its going down. The sides are raised and they touch the upper teeth on the sides. They dont push the teeth. They just lightly touch the sides of your upper teeth. The back part of your tongue is raised. Its pulled into a ball and raised toward to the roof of your mouth, back here. So, Im going to feel vibration here. Im going to round my lips and my tongue will take this position /ɜː/ . If you do not pull your tongue back into that tight ball you will not get the correct sound. Youll have something like /ɜ/. And thats not correct. Let me take that incorrect sound and gradually correct it by pulling it into a tight ball /ɜ-ɜ-ɜː/ So what youre hearing is an incorrect sound thats being slowly corrected because Im pulling the back part of my tongue into a tight ball. And again, that tight ball is raised toward the roof of my mouth /ɜ-ɜ-ɜː/. Got it?
When you finish that sound hold it out. I want you to hold that sound and feel where your tongue is. The front part should still be raised and the sides of your tongue should still have contact with the sides of your upper teeth. Try holding out the sound /ɜ-ɜ-ɜː/. Do you feel the teeth? And you should not feel the bump. Because your tongue is raised but not touching /ɜ-ɜ-ɜː/ . All right . Lets try this sound in words.

Exercise 1:
In the following words the /ɜː/ sound is in a stressed syllable. Note the different spellings. The /ɜː/ sound can be spelled -ur, -ir, -er. Listen and repeat after me:
Turn, hurt, fur, curtain, Thursday, dirt, bird, shirt, first, circle, serve, certain, person, perfect, term.
The /ɜː/ sound can also be spelled -or, -our, -ear. Now these first four words might be challenging for some of you. But well talk about the /w/ sound and the /l/ sound a little bit later. And well talk about how its different from the /r/ sound. For now do your best and repeat after me:
Word, work, journalist, journal, earth, heard.

Exercise 2:
Read each statement and choose the correct answer. Example. Read the statement to yourself and then Ill tell you the answer.
In English, we say many people but one___________ .
a. journalist
b. term
c. person ;
The answer is person.
1. In warm weather, what do people put on?
a. fur
b. dirt
c. shirt ;
Answer : a shirt.

2. Read the statement to yourself first:
In English, we say OUCH! or Ow! if we are ___________ .
a. certain
b. hurt The answer is hurt
c. person ;
The answer is hurt.

3. We live on planet ___________.
a. Earth
b. Thursday
c. circle;
The answer is Earth.

4. Term is a special ______.
a. bird
b. word
c. curtain;
The answer is word.
Exercise 3:
In these words the /ɜː/ sound is in unstressed syllable. For example, this first word is enter. The stress is on the first syllable, not -er. Listen closely and repeat after me:
Enter, teacher, other, father, motherhood, energy, computer, perhaps, summertime.
Now lets move on to phrases and sentences. Listen and repeat after me:
Enter motherhood; other energy; perhaps in summertime. The teacher spoke faster. The father needs a computer.

End of Part I. Please go on to the second part of this lesson.

Beginner Week 12: Closing a call

(0)

13_Elvis Presley - Love Me Tender

, 30 2012 . 20:08 +



(0)

14_South Pacific " Some Enchanted Evening "

, 30 2012 . 21:38 +












(0)

15_Weavers - Goodnight Irene

, 30 2012 . 22:27 +















(0)

16_Pete Seeger Little Boxes

, 30 2012 . 22:34 +



(0)

17_Abba - I Do, I Do, I Do, I Do, I Do

, 30 2012 . 22:51 +













(0)

18_Peter,Paul & Mary Live[4],Where Have All The Flowers Gone?

, 30 2012 . 23:26 +



(0)

10 youtube

, 15 2012 . 21:08 +
Joker-6 [ + !]

10 youtube

1. Duncaninchina www.youtube.com/duncaninchina/
2. VOA Learning English www.youtube.com/voalearningenglish/
3. Learn English with Steve Ford www.youtube.com/user/PrivateEnglishPortal
4. Business English Videos for ESL www.youtube.com/bizpod/
5. Bbclearningenglish www.youtube.com/bbclearningenglish/
6. PodEnglish www.youtube.com/podenglish/
7. JenniferESL www.youtube.com/user/JenniferESL
8. Real English www.youtube.com/realenglish1/
9. The Daily English Show www.youtube.com/user/thedailyenglishshow
10. Sozoexchange www.youtube.com/sozoexchange/


xWoT2l6tXlM (512x512, 28Kb)


(0)

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, 02 2012 . 05:08 +
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, 02 2012 . 07:32 +
YuliaBelka [ + !]




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34 . – , , , . . . .



35 . , , . – , . , , , . , , .

37 . , . , .

40 . - . , , . , , , . .

45 . - . , , , . . , , .

46 . – , . , - .
,
47 . , , , .

48 . . , 48 .

49 . , , . , .

. , . , , , , . , 50 . , . 50- .

55 . ! - , . .

. - , . . .

65 . – , , , . .

67, 5 . , . , , .

70 . : , . , , . .

75 . . , .

80 . , , . .

100- . , . ! - : 126- 116- . .

" ":
1 - 50
2 - !
3 - - ?
4 -
5 -
6 -
7 - ......
...
10 -
11 -
12 -

(0)

= 1

, 22 2013 . 21:52 +
lu-e [ + !]

= 1

, !!

1.
kuk3-1 (481x700, 283Kb)

2.
kuk3-2 (447x700, 169Kb)

...


(0)

= 2

, 22 2013 . 21:59 +
lu-e [ + !]

= 2


41.
kuk3-41 (476x700, 197Kb)

...


(0)

, 12 2013 . 23:20 +
_ [ + !]



 Mary53

Mary53, . !

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(0)

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, 15 2014 . 03:08 +
Belenaya [ + !]

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(0)

11 ,

, 15 2014 . 03:10 +
Belenaya [ + !]

11 ,

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 : [2] 1