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   DScreative

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 LiveInternet.ru:
: 29.07.2012
: 16074
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: (696), (114), (8), )))(90), (134), , , (50), (188), (1262), )(31), (715), (34), / ( )(175), (847), (2), (3), !!!!!(968), (13), (27), (1361), (3066), (571), (, )(509), (5056)
(0)

? . ↓↓↓

, 06 2012 . 13:07 +


1.
FirsnOdqdZU (551x456, 42Kb)

2.
oytr449XjpY (547x343, 43Kb)

3.
rIe_f2RsaVM (604x413, 66Kb)

4.
XFgbBLKF3Oo (515x434, 36Kb)

5.
yVoyFhAPZXI (604x349, 66Kb)


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(0)

English Rhyming Slang

, 07 2012 . 00:32 +
Cockney rhyming slang first started to appear on the streets of the East End of London during the 19thcentury and was primarily used as a secret language through which criminals could communicate with one another without being understood by the police. However, despite its origins, it has remained popular with all people in that area of the country and is still very much in use today. People who use these slang expressions generally substitute one word with two or more words that rhyme with the original word in order to speak in some type of code. Some slang expressions have escaped from London and are in popular use throughout the rest of Britain. For example "use your loaf" is an everyday phrase for the British, but not too many people realise it is Cockney Rhyming Slang ("loaf of bread: head"). There are many more examples of this unwitting use of Cockney Rhyming Slang.

Cockney Rhyming Slang may have had its highs and lows but today it is in use as never before. In the last few years hundreds of brand new slang expressions have been invented - many betraying their modern roots, eg "Emma Freuds: hemorrhoids"; (Emma Freud is a TV and radio broadcaster) and "Ayrton Senna": tenner (10 pound note). Modern Cockney slang that is being developed today tends to only rhyme words with the names of celebrities or famous people. There are very few new Cockney slang expressions that do not follow this trend. The only one that has gained much ground recently that bucks this trend is "Wind and Kite" meaning "Web site".

Adam and Eve = believe
apples and pears = stairs
boat race = face
brass tacks = facts
bread and honey (commonly shortened to "bread") = money
brown bread = dead
butcher's hook (commonly shortened to "butchers") = look
chewy toffee = coffee
china plate (commonly shortened to "China") = mate
cream crackered = knackered
daisy roots = boots
ding dong = song (now it is used to refer to a fight or argument)
dog and bone = phone
dustbin lids = kids (children)
elephants trunk (commonly shortened to "elephants") = drunk
frog and toad = road
half inch = pinch (steal)
jam jar = car
John Cleese = cheese
John Major = pager
loaf of bread (commonly shortened to "loaf") = head
mince pies (commonly shortened to "minces") = eyes
north and south = mouth
old bag = hag (horrible woman/ugly woman)
on the floor = poor
Oxo cube (commonly shortened to "Oxo") = tube (the London Underground)
pen and ink (commonly shortened to "pen") = stink
plates of meat = feet
pork pie (commonly shortened to "porky") = lie
rabbit and pork (commonly shortened to "rabbit") = talk
Ruby Murray = curry
skin and blister = sister
sky rocket = pocket
tea leaf = thief
Tom and Dick = sick
trouble and strife (commonly shortened to "trouble") = wife
turkish bath = laugh
two and eight = state (mess)
weasel and stoat (commonly shortened to "weasel") = coat
whistle and fluite = suite
_____________________________________________


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(0)

, 07 2012 . 00:34 +
CeEeo1alv38 (432x308, 28Kb)
, , , ; =breaking up, , , ; : , , , /, , ( Queen :), , , " " ""


:  
(0)

, 04 2012 . 18:06 +
- , , .

accord [ ə'kɔ:d ] ,
accurate [ 'ækjurit ]
cabin [ 'kæbin ]
cabinet [ 'kæbinet ] ,
camera ['kæm(ə)rə]
cataract [ 'kætərækt ]
chef [ ʃef ] -
data [ 'deitə ]
fabric [ 'fæbrik ]
figure [ 'figə ] ,
genial ['ʤiːnɪəl]
intelligence [ in'teliʤəns ] ,
lily of the valley [ 'lili əv ði: 'væli ]
magazine [ ,mægə'zi:n ]
officer [ 'ɔfisə ] ,
production [ prə'dʌkʃən ]
prospect [ 'prɔspekt ]
realize ['rɪəlaɪz] ,
record [ 'rekɔ:d ] ,
satin [ 'sætin ]
sodium ['səudɪəm]
spectacles [ 'spektəklz ]
tender [ 'tendə ]
vacuum ['vækjuːm]
angina [ æn'ʤainə ]
band [ bænd ] ,
climax [ 'klaimæks ] ,
compositor [ kəm'pɒzɪtər ]
gymnasium [ʤɪm'neɪzɪəm]
list [ list ]
replica [ 'replikə ]
speculation [ ,spekju'leiʃən ] ,
talon [ 'tælən ]
troop [ tru:p ] ,


:  
(0)

;)

, 04 2012 . 18:18 +
- :

1) , .... - Thank you very much for your email.
2) , . .- We will do our best to proceed with your request however for the best result the documents should reach us not later than tomorrow.
3) ? - You can find this information below.
4) !- Kind reminder
5) , - Please sign in the place marked with yellow sticker
6) ? - Let's reconfirm the figures.
7) .- Thank you for your kind assistance.
8) . - Kindly find attached.
9) , . - Ill look into it and revert soonest.
10) - Please kindly review the matter again.
11) , - I hope this helps, otherwise please do not hesitate to contact me anytime.
12) ... - Thank you for your patience
13) , - We will let you know in due course.
14) , - We would be happy to offer you the most favourable conditions on the case-to-case basis.
15) , .- So if you have eventually some needs from your clientele, it can have a real added-value.
16) -, ! - We regret to know that you are not satisfied with our services.
17) . - . - We look forward to hearing from you.
18) . - good to hear from you and have a nice weekend
19) . . - Thanks a lot in advance
20) ...- We consider the matter settled and close our files.
21) - ( ) - Very best regards


:  
(0)

10 - .

, 04 2012 . 18:25 +
10. Flop (.) , , .
flopper -, .

9. Photobomb .

8. A fail . : , . Fail , , , .

7. Fail , , epic fail !

6. lipdub , . lipdub , , , .

5. Sick . , -, , .

4. A noob , , - , .

3. , pwned p, owned. - Being owned , - ( , , ).

2. POS parents over shoulder ( ) , - ( ), ( , ).

1. A hater -, . , , , .

1.
21 (550x400, 18Kb)

2.
22 (550x400, 20Kb)

3.
23 (550x400, 14Kb)

4.
24 (550x400, 18Kb)

5.
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6.
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7.
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8.
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9.
29 (550x400, 15Kb)

10.
30 (550x400, 12Kb)


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(0)

, 04 2012 . 19:56 +


/GREEN , , , .
green hand - , .

/YELLOW , , , yellow streak .

, /BLUE , . , :
feel blue - ;
blue devils - , ,

see RED , , " ". : turn black (blue) in the face - / .

go/ turn WHITE with rage/fear - / to become livid with rage - .
/PINK- , be in the pink of health - , . - .

/PURPLE , be born in purple , , .

/BLACK - , black dog.


:  
(0)

.

, 04 2012 . 20:05 +

fnMHSIGlDYE (477x480, 75Kb)


:  
(2)

.

, 12 2012 . 23:57 +
Let me -
I hope -
It is to be noted - . ( .)
We have no doubt of (that) - . ( .)
As you may know - , ,
to take the liberty of -
to draw your attention to -
to take into consideration, to take into account -
the matter of great importance -
at the present time -
in case of necessity -
without fail -
as soon as possible -
at your convenience -
mentioned above -
in general -
for example -
etc. -
in no case -
except for -
despite the fact that -
as a result of -
in accordance with -
in view of the above said -
on the ground that -
according to -
as follows -
not above -
to a great extent -
to a certain extent /degree -
in order to -
as far as -
in addition to
a pleasant surprise -
It gives me a great pleasure to introduce -
I am just writing a few lines to introduce - ,
I sincerely regret that - ,
To my great regret I must inform you that - ,
I regret to inform you that - ,
Please, accept my apologies for - ,
I must apologize that -
I am afraid that - ,
Unfortunately -
I will keep you informed -
Let me inform you - ,
Pay special attention to. -
Please, take a note of - ,
Add some data about -
I will be in touch as soon as -
This is to inform you that - ,
I am attaching some information about -
to confirm that - ,
to keep informed -
to let know (without delay) - , ( )


:  
(0)

12 :

, 12 2012 . 00:07 +
Better Late Than Never (. , )
This idiom is simple but effective. It implies () that a belated () achievement () is better than not reaching a goal () at all.
One might say, The achievement is long overdue (), but its better late than never.

On the Spur of the Moment (. )
This popular saying denotes () a spontaneous (, ) or sudden () undertaking ().
For example, Linda and Louis drove to the beach on the spur of the moment.

Once in a Blue Moon (. )
A blue moon is a colloquial () term applied () to the second full moon in one month. This idiom means something is rare () or infrequent ().
For example, Homebodies () Mary and James only go out once in a blue moon.

Living on Borrowed Time (. )
Following an illness or near-death experience (, ), many people believe they have cheated () death.
Heres an example: After Jim was struck () by lightning (), he felt like he was living on borrowed time.

In the Interim (. )
This frequently () used phrase is interchangeable () with in the meantime ( ), which is another time-related saying. It denotes () a period of time between something that ended and something that happened afterwards ().

In Broad Daylight (. )
When something occurs () in broad daylight, it means the event is clearly visible ().
Heres an example: Two coyotes brazenly () walked across the lawn () in broad daylight.

Against the Clock (. - )
This common () idiom means time is working against a project or plan instigated () by a group or an individual ( , ).
For example, In movies, writers love to create countdowns where the main characters are working against the clock.

All in Good Time (. )
Patience () is an uncommon virtue (, ). When individuals are inpatient, friends often assure () them that things will happen eventually ( ).

Big Time (. , , )
This versatile (), informal idiom is used to denote () something of extreme severity ().
For example, When he landed () the position as vice president, he knew he had reached the big time.

The Time is Ripe (. )
When the time is ripe, its advantageous () to undertake () plans that have been waiting for awhile ( ).
Heres an example: Raphael was planning a trip overseas ( ), and the time was finally ripe.

Have the Time of Your Life (. )
The 1980s movie Dirty Dancing turned this idiom into a song that became one of the films most iconic () tracks.
For example, Genevieve had the time of her life touring ( ) Italy.

Time is Money (. )
If time is going to waste (), money isnt being made. This popular idiom attributed () to Ben Franklin is frequently ()
used in relation to business or employment ().
Heres an example: Its wise to use every minute productively because time is money.


:  
(0)

30

, 15 2012 . 23:04 +
, , , , , , !

10: online

1. UC Berkeley webcast.berkeley.edu/
2. MIT Open Courseware ocw.mit.edu/courses/
3. Carnegie Mellon's Open Learning Initiative oli.web.cmu.edu/openlearning
4. Utah State OpenCourseWare ocw.usu.edu/front-page/Courses_listing
5. Tufts OpenCourseWare ocw.tufts.edu/CourseList
6. Openlearn openlearn.open.ac.uk/course/index.php
7. JHSPH OCW ocw.jhsph.edu/topics.cfm
8. Connexions cnx.org/content/
9. Sophia sofia.fhda.edu/gallery/
10. University of Washington Computer Science & Engineering www.cs.washington.edu/education/course-webs.html

10: .

1. Instructional videos providing answers to common questions. www.5min.com
2. Big Think Video interviews with 600+ thought leaders in a range of fields. www.bigthink.com/
3. Brightstorm Short-form online video lessons by professional educators. Free math lessons. www.brightstorm.com/
4. Edublogs.tv Aggregator and host of educational videos. www.edublogs.tv/
5. Futures Channel High quality multimedia content ideal for use in the classroom. www.thefutureschannel.com/
6. Howcast Professional and user-generated how-to videos. www.howcast.com/
7. Internet Archive Collection of more than two-hundred thousand free historical videos, many academic. www.archive.org/
8. Math TV Professional video lessons in mathematics. Covers basic math through calculus. www.mathtv.com/
9. ResearchChannel 3,500 videos from distinguished researchers and scholars. www.researchchannel.org/
10. Teachers TV Engaging, professional videos and practical resources for educator development. www.teachers.tv/

10:

1. Academic Earth academicearth.org/
2. Ignite igniteshow.com/
3. PopTech poptech.org/
4. Free Video Lectures freevideolectures.com/
5. Videolectures videolectures.net/
6. OpenCourseWare Consortium www.ocwconsortium.org/
7. 60 Second Lectures www.sas.upenn.edu/home/news/sixtysec_lectures_archive..
8. MathTv www.mathtv.com/videos_by_topic
9. Forum Network forum-network.org/
10. KhanAcademy www.khanacademy.org/


:  
(0)

.

, 15 2012 . 23:06 +
- to be
was, were, been ()

come, came, come ()
"be" "come" -
,
become, became, become (, )
-
go, went, gone (, , )

- say, said, said ()

- read, read, read ()
:
: take, took, taken! ()
-
think, thought, thought ()
,
see, sw, seen ()
-
- eat, ate, eaten ()
...
feel, felt, felt (
, ,
drink, drank, drunk ()

learn, learnt, learnt (()
.
: meet, met, met ()
.
know, knew known ()
...
sit, sat, sat ()

, write, wrote, written ()


:  
(0)

, to bear

, 15 2012 . 23:22 +
1) Can you put me down at the next corner, please? , .
> , ()

2) Put down whatever you're doing and join the party! !
> , ()

3) You'd be surprised at the amount that boy can put down in a single day. , , .
> (.) ( ); ;

4) I have put down over 100 eggs this winter. .
> (-.)

5) Put down every word she says. .

6) I'll take three boxes; would you put them down (to my account)? ; ?
Put me down for £ 5. 5 .
Put me down for a donation! ( / )
> (-.)

7) to put down 10 % as a deposit 10 % ( )
> ()

8) The troops put down the rebellion. .
> , ,

10) Tom's latest book has been severely put down in the newspaper reports. .
> (.) ,

11) Put down your expenditure. .
> (); ()

12) He made an unkind remark, intended to put her down. , .
> (.) ,

13) I put him down for a fool. .
> (put down for) (-.), (-.), (-. / -.)

14) I put his bad temper down to his recent illness. .
> (put down to) (-.), (-. / -.)

15) The pilot was able to put the damaged plane down safely. .
> () ;
>, ()

!


:  
(0)

, 18 2012 . 00:19 +


1.
r1vr0pAKC08 (604x454, 72Kb)


:  
(0)

(DEGREES OF COMPARISON)

, 27 2012 . 22:29 +
: , .

a. (The Positive Degree) - , .

b. (The Comparative Degree) , . than - .

c. (The Superlative Degree) , .

1.
21 (593x604, 91Kb)

2.
22 (574x386, 40Kb)

3.
355dQpkxfaI (604x339, 52Kb)


:  
(0)

. , . .

, 02 2012 . 20:25 +

VPZs_WyVA70 (604x395, 64Kb)


:  
(0)

, 07 2012 . 13:03 +


1.
6 (604x453, 42Kb)

2.
7 (508x604, 68Kb)


:  
(0)

- (Computer)

, 07 2012 . 23:24 +
ability - ,
accurate -
(to) affect -
amount of date -
approximately -
(to) attain -
available -
broadband connection -
(to) browse -
browser - ,
(to) carry out -
computer desk -
computer mouse -
(photo)copier -
(to) count - ,
CPU -
(to) crack -
dangerous -
data (datum) - , ,
defense - ,
(to) deploy - ,
(to) design - , ,
(to) determine -
dial up -
digital -
display -
(to) download - , ( )
drive -
electronic device -
electronic mail -
email accounts -
(to) enable - -
(to) enhance - ,
essential -
except - ,
facsimile message -
fast modem -
(to) finding -
flash drive (card) - -
floppy disk -
(to) handle - ,
hard drive -
informational server -
(to) intercept - ( ..)
interface - ,
keyboard -
laptop -
(to) last -
layman - , ,
(to) log in - ,
(to) math - ,
message -
monitor -
motherboard
(the) net - ,
network -
notwithstanding - , ,
obsolete -
operating system -
overload -
(to) perform - ,
player -
printer -
processing unit -
(to) provide - , ;
provider - ,
query - ,
(to) receive - ,
reliable -
(to) respond - ,
scale -
(to) scan -
scanner -
search-program - -
security -
(to) send -
set of instructions - ( )
significant - , ,
site -
society -
(to) solve - , ;
source -
speakers -
storage -
(to) surf -
system unit -
tool - ,
(to) type - ,
(to) update -
user -
virtual reality -
voice message -
voltage -
window -


:  
(0)

, 13 2012 . 15:32 +


1.
xhKRkOR_BQg (462x357, 51Kb)


:  
(0)

, 15 2012 . 14:52 +
WildHeaven [ + !]



. , , . Intermediate .

English as a Second Language (ESL) podcast - , , ! - , , ( )
http://www.eslpod.com/website/show_all.php?cat_id=-58456&low_rec=0#

Listen to English , . , .
http://www.listen-to-english.com/

British Coucil podcast - , ( ).
http://www.britishcouncil.org/learnenglish-central-listening-downloads.htm

Fun English Lessons ! , very funny!
http://www.china232.com/

, , , . , "Out of the frying pan and into the fire" " ".
http://mrtranslate.ru/video/english.html

- , , . , Download Podcast=)
http://www.thebobandrobshow.com/website/show_all.php

Intermediate. , , ))
http://www.englishlingq.com/

, - Radio Lingua Network podcasts. , , . , . , , , ))
http://www.radiolingua.com/ourpodcasts/index.html

:
Cambridge , CAMBRIDGE FIRST CERTIFICATE -
http://www.englishjet.com/english_courses_files/tests.htm

( !). !
http://www.franklang.ru/index.php?option=com_conte...tionid=2&id=9&Itemid=9

, - ! , =))
Good luck!


:  

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